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Bladder leakage is an unfortunate side effect of surgery for prostate cancer. At WMHP we are passionate about helping men regain bladder control after surgery, and also in teaching other health professionals how to best manage this condition.
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Bladder leakage is a significant problem for Australian women and is an issue that needs to be taken more seriously. There are over 5 million Australians who experience bladder leakage and 80% of these are women. The physical, emotional and social impact that this can have on a woman’s life cannot be underestimated. Whilst bladder leakage is very common, it is also very treatable - pelvic floor muscle training is the number one recommended treatment world-wide.
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Good sleep is hard to come by during this pandemic. The challenges of working from home, juggling home schooling or young children not attending care, missing friends and family, and increased stress, worry or financial uncertainty can all contribute to keeping you awake. Unfortunately, not getting enough sleep has a big impact on our mental and physical health. This article shares our top “sleep hygiene” tips to help ensure you have a more restful night’s sleep.
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Prolapse can be a bit of a scary word. Women have often heard horror stories from their mothers, aunties or friends. However, having a prolapse isn’t actually that scary. It’s also very common – 1 in 2 women who have had a baby have one. Want to know the good news? Prolapse is very treatable, and pelvic floor exercises are the number one treatment recommended for prolapse worldwide.
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Did you know that carrying a few extra kilo’s around your stomach can affect your bladder control? Unfortunately, the lifestyle changes associated with being at home more during COVID-19 have led to some people gaining extra weight. In this article we outline how weight gain and bladder control are related, and what you can do about it.
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Since spending more time at home due to COVID-19, many of our patients have been complaining of needing to wee more often, rushing to the toilet, having accidents on the way, and waking more often overnight to wee.  So many factors may be contributing to this, but some common culprits are drinking too much caffeine (and alcohol!!), high stress/anxiety levels, and having easy access to the toilet.  We share our top tips for keeping your bladder happy and healthy at home.
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One of the most common questions we get asked by our post-natal patients is: when can I start running again after having my baby? Our experienced pelvic health physiotherapist Kathryn Oldman answers this question and more, in a video covering all the important aspects of safely returning to exercise after pregnancy.
Thanks to COVID the gyms are currently closed, and many of you are working out at home. There are so many great exercise apps and online programs out there, and it's been amazing to see the creativity and variety of what you have been doing at home.
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One excellent way to reduce stress is the practice of mindfulness or relaxation. Our experienced physiotherapist Jane Richards shares with you a 15 minute guided relaxation, and a 10 minute guided mindfulness practice.
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal (gut) disorder. Symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhoea or constipation impact your daily life and make you miss school, work and fun social activities.

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