A condition we often see in men and women is shy bladder syndrome (aka paruresis), a term used to describe people who find it difficult or impossible to urinate near other people. This is quite a common social phobia, secondary only to the fear of public speaking. It often begins at school, and symptoms can vary in different situations – eg. going to a public toilet where there are others around (ie school, restaurant, the MCG!) can be quite challenging for people with this condition!
In Australia, 1.34 million men and boys live with incontinence. A national health campaign is set to improve their social and economic participation and quality of life – but it needs support. BINS4Blokes is an Australia-wide awareness campaign advocating for the installation of incontinence bins in male public toilet facilities. The campaign is an initiative of the not-for-profit Continence Foundation of Australia, Australia’s peak body in promoting bladder and bowel health.
Bladder leakage is an unfortunate side effect of surgery for prostate cancer. At WMHP we are passionate about helping men regain bladder control after surgery, and also in teaching other health professionals how to best manage this condition.
Did you know that carrying a few extra kilo’s around your stomach can affect your bladder control? Unfortunately, the lifestyle changes associated with being at home more during COVID-19 have led to some people gaining extra weight. In this article we outline how weight gain and bladder control are related, and what you can do about it.
Thanks to COVID the gyms are currently closed, and many of you are working out at home. There are so many great exercise apps and online programs out there, and it's been amazing to see the creativity and variety of what you have been doing at home.
Waking overnight to wee is annoying, and can leave you feeling tired. But did you know it can also have a big effect on many other areas of your health? People who wee twice or more overnight have four times the risk of developing heart disease and double the risk of early death!. There’s new research that gives you concrete ways to reduce those nightly trips to the loo.
Pelvic floor problems don’t need to stop you from exercising. There are many types of exercise that are safe to do even if your pelvic floor is weak. Here are 10 pelvic-floor friendly exercises to help you spring into springtime.
Life is complicated. Sex is complicated. Sex is influenced by everything that is happening in our lives, and sex influences what is happening in our lives. They are not separable.
The pelvic floor muscles have typically been seen as ‘women’s business’, but did you know that men have a pelvic floor too? When a man’s pelvic floor is not working properly, it can lead to bladder problems, bowel problems, erectile dysfunction, or pain in the genitals and pelvis. Many of these problems can be improved, and often cured, by seeing a pelvic floor physiotherapist.
Constipation is uncomfortable, but did you also know it weakens your pelvic floor? Straining and pushing when you poo can lead to bladder or bowel leakage, prolapse, and haemorrhoids. Here are five simple tips for a perfect poo. Trust us, they work. Your bowel will thank you for it.

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Our Locations

Camberwell
549 Burke Rd, Camberwell VIC 3124
T: 03 8823 8300
F: 03 8823 8399
Hampton
170 Thomas St, Hampton VIC 3188
T: 03 9521 0444
F: 03 9521 0777 

Also consulting at:

Box Hill:  Epworth Eastern Ekera, Level 2, Suite 2.10, 116-118 Thames Street
East Bentleigh: Southern Urology, 7 Chester Street
East Melbourne: Urology Consultants Victoria, Suite 102, Freemasons Hospital, 320 Victoria Parade
Malvern: Australian Urology Associates, Ground Floor, 322 Glenferrie Road
Malvern: Cabrini Mother and Baby Centre, Area E, Level 2, Cabrini Hospital, 183 Wattletree Road

If you’d like to make an appointment for one of these locations please call our Camberwell rooms on 03 8823 8300