Everything we do is programmed and recorded by the brain in unique patterns involving millions of brain and nerve cells, which function like a map. These maps start to develop from the moment we are born and explain some of the processes involved when we learn how to walk, run, or any new activity that becomes second nature.
The concept of sensorimotor retraining gained national and international attention in 2022 when a group of Australian researchers found promising benefits of graded sensorimotor retraining on pain intensity in patients with chronic low back pain. Known as the RESOLVE¹ study, they used a framework that included graded, novel precise exercises which showed statistically significant improvements in pain. As movement therapists it is important that Physiotherapists understand how changes in sensorimotor representation within a sensitised nervous system requires us to move beyond typical therapeutic stretching and strengthening exercises. We take a deep dive into the neuroscience behind this and explain how remapping exercises can target the sensorimotor dysregulation contributors to persistent pelvic and sexual pain.
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The 23rd Asia Pacific Prostate Cancer Conference gathered almost 400 of the leading Australian and international Urologists, Oncologists, Pelvic Health Physiotherapists, Prostate Cancer Specialist Nurses, Urology Nurses and other health practitioners in this field together to share the most recent advances in research and treatment and learn about the improved management of prostate cancer. Shan Morrison was part of the organising committee for the conference that developed the Nursing and Allied Health Program.
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According to the 2022 European Association of Urology Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain, Persistent Pelvic Pain (PPP) is persistent pain perceived in structures related to the pelvis of either men or women. PPP can be further categorised as Chronic Primary Pelvic Pain, where there is no obvious pathology and Chronic Secondary Pelvic Pain, where there is specific disease or pathology associated pelvic pain. For both categories, pain must have been continuous or recurrent for at least 3 months or have been in a cyclical pattern for at least 6 months.
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Whilst commonly overlooked, dysfunctional breathing patterns contribute to many pelvic health disorders. In our clinical practice, we regularly screen for and notice altered and suboptimal breathing patterns in people that have pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction (with increased OR decreased resting muscle tone), persistent pelvic and sexual pain as well as urinary and anorectal dysfunction.
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It may appear a little strange to write a blog about breathing, when it is something that we do 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and have been doing so consciously and subconsciously since we were born! However, just because breathing is automatic, it doesn’t mean that we do it effectively! Many people hold their breath without realising, they breathe into their upper chest only, or they don’t breathe in and out all the way. Being more aware of your breath and optimising the way you breathe can have a profound impact not only on your pelvic health, but your health in general.
This article is a personal story written by one of our patients (she/her) with Endometriosis who asked if she could share her experience in both our patient and referrer blog. Her journey highlights the significant impact that a multidisciplinary health care team that communicates regularly can have on supporting people with Endometriosis. We value being included in this MDT and learning from other health care practitioners to improve patient outcomes and help them achieve their goals.
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There’s a reason why people say they go to the toilet to relieve themselves - emptying your bowel completely and easily is extremely satisfying! We had such a great response to a previous blog we wrote “5 Tips For A Perfect Poo”, we thought we would follow up by answering some of our commonly asked questions about bowels. This may help you get that feeling of relief on the toilet!
Lactation disorders may be considered by many to be simple and straightforward, however, they are actually quite complex. The guidelines for diagnosis and management of these conditions is regularly being updated based on emerging evidence. We explore common misconceptions and truths that surround lactation disorders.
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There is Level 1 evidence (recommendation A) that pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) should be first line treatment for Urinary Incontinence (UI) and Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) in women. This high evidence base is only true in a clinical setting if PFMT is performed correctly and effectively.
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