Bladder leakage is a significant problem for Australian women. Affecting 1 in 3 women of all ages, this is an issue that needs to be taken seriously. When a woman is not able to control her bladder, it can affect her life profoundly. Women will often stop exercising, withdraw from intimacy, have reduced self-esteem, and stop doing things they love.

Urinary incontinence (UI) is a significant problem for Australian women. Affecting 1 in 3 women of all ages, this is an issue that needs to be taken seriously. When a woman is not able to control her bladder, it can affect her life profoundly. Women will often stop exercising, withdraw from intimacy, have reduced self-esteem, and avoid engaging in things they enjoy. Shockingly, a large population-based study found that 75% of affected women don’t seek help, and among those who do seek help, only 12% actually ended up receiving care1. Incontinence is highly prevalent but very treatable – and pelvic floor muscle training is the grade A, first line recommended treatment for stress, urge or mixed incontinence2. We know that you know this – but do women know this? It is our job to ensure the message is heard, understood and acted upon.

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Good sleep is hard to come by during this pandemic. The challenges of working from home, juggling home schooling or young children not attending care, missing friends and family, and increased stress, worry or financial uncertainty can all contribute to keeping you awake. Unfortunately, not getting enough sleep has a big impact on our mental and physical health. This article shares our top “sleep hygiene” tips to help ensure you have a more restful night’s sleep.
Did you know that carrying a few extra kilo’s around your stomach can affect your bladder control? Unfortunately, the lifestyle changes associated with being at home more during COVID-19 have led to some people gaining extra weight. In this article we outline how weight gain and bladder control are related, and what you can do about it.
We have noticed a recent dramatic increase in pelvic pain presentations that appear to be triggered by higher levels of stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. When a patient presents with chronic pain, it is no longer acceptable to view them through a narrow lens. More and more research now supports what we have long known, that chronic pain is driven by a sensitised nervous system. Unfortunately, stress and anxiety feed directly into sensitised nervous systems, further heightening the pain experience1.
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For women with pelvic organ prolapse, the lifestyle changes associated with being at home during COVID-19 are having a big impact on their symptoms. Women are home with their kids more, and doing heavier house and garden work. As the gyms and pools are closed, many have also turned to running or high impact online exercise programs, all of which are contributing. Given the strong evidence base for conservative management of mild-moderate pelvic organ prolapse, we would like to share 5 treatment options.
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At Women’s & Men’s Health Physiotherapy the health and well-being of our patients, staff & community are our number one priority, and we are closely monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.  

Physiotherapy is deemed an essential service, and you can be reassured we are able to remain open and continue to see patients face to face throughout this period.  In addition to our already strict infection control protocols, we have implemented a number of additional measures to help protect our patients and staff.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal (gut) disorder. Symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhoea or constipation impact your daily life and make you miss school, work and fun social activities.
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder. Symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhoea or constipation (or alternating) are frequent. These impact daily life, mental wellbeing, increase absenteeism from work/school and affect social activities.
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Exercise is a vital part of cancer management. The benefits are not only physical. Exercise can improve mood, symptoms of depression, and also have an impact on the body’s immune system and chances of overall survival. The benefits of exercise in cancer are so widely supported that it is now recommended by the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia that exercise be a part of everyone’s cancer care.
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Our Locations

Camberwell
549 Burke Rd, Camberwell VIC 3124
T: 03 8823 8300
F: 03 8823 8399
Hampton
170 Thomas St, Hampton VIC 3188
T: 03 9521 0444
F: 03 9521 0777 

Also consulting at:

Box Hill:  Epworth Eastern Ekera, Level 2, Suite 2.10, 116-118 Thames Street
East Bentleigh: Southern Urology, 7 Chester Street
East Melbourne: Urology Consultants Victoria, Suite 102, Freemasons Hospital, 320 Victoria Parade
Malvern: Australian Urology Associates, Ground Floor, 322 Glenferrie Road
Malvern: Cabrini Mother and Baby Centre, Area E, Level 2, Cabrini Hospital, 183 Wattletree Road

If you’d like to make an appointment for one of these locations please call our Camberwell rooms on 03 8823 8300