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During pregnancy, there is a large amount of pressure placed on the pelvic floor muscles. Imagine the pelvis is like a trampoline; the rim being the bones of the pelvis, the springs being the ligaments and the mat being the pelvic floor muscles. The weight of the growing baby, hormonal changes and weight gain, weaken and stretch the mat and the springs, which is exacerbated further by vaginal birth. It is well known that weakness of the pelvic floor muscles (the mat) can lead to the development of poor control of the bladder and bowel (incontinence) and pelvic organ prolapse.
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So many of our patients diagnosed with a prolapse stop exercising. Exercise may exacerbate their prolapse symptoms, or they may be worried about making their prolapse worse. But exercise is so crucial to look after both physical and mental health. One of the most common questions we get from our patients with prolapse is: what type of exercise am I able to do?
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Endometriosis-related pain levels are not always related to the extent of endometrial lesions. For many people, pain may not be relieved after removing the endometriosis through surgery, or hormonal treatment to suppress menstruation. Changes to the nervous system (brain, spinal cord and nerves) is one way to understand why some people don’t respond to current methods to treat their endometriosis-related pain.
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The inspiration for this piece is from one of our favourite books, “Come As You Are”, by Dr Emily Nagoski. Dr Nagoski has pulled together 10 years of research into women’s sexuality, and shares an essential exploration on how female arousal, desire, autonomy, pleasure and orgasm works, and provides tools for women to create and sustain a fulfilling sex life.
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A condition we often see in men and women is shy bladder syndrome (aka paruresis), a term used to describe people who find it difficult or impossible to urinate near other people. This is quite a common social phobia, secondary only to the fear of public speaking. It often begins at school, and symptoms can vary in different situations – eg. going to a public toilet where there are others around (ie school, restaurant, the MCG!) can be quite challenging for people with this condition!
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Bladder leakage is a significant problem for Australian women. Affecting 1 in 3 women of all ages, this is an issue that needs to be taken seriously. When a woman is not able to control her bladder, it can affect her life profoundly. Women will often stop exercising, withdraw from intimacy, have reduced self-esteem, and stop doing things they love.
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Prolapse can be a bit of a scary word. Women have often heard horror stories from their mothers, aunties or friends. However, having a prolapse isn’t actually that scary. It’s also very common – 1 in 2 women who have had a baby have one. Want to know the good news? Prolapse is very treatable, and pelvic floor exercises are the number one treatment recommended for prolapse worldwide.
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Did you know that carrying a few extra kilo’s around your stomach can affect your bladder control? Unfortunately, the lifestyle changes associated with being at home more during COVID-19 have led to some people gaining extra weight. In this article we outline how weight gain and bladder control are related, and what you can do about it.
Thanks to COVID the gyms are currently closed, and many of you are working out at home. There are so many great exercise apps and online programs out there, and it's been amazing to see the creativity and variety of what you have been doing at home.
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Waking overnight to wee is annoying, and can leave you feeling tired. But did you know it can also have a big effect on many other areas of your health? People who wee twice or more overnight have four times the risk of developing heart disease and double the risk of early death!. There’s new research that gives you concrete ways to reduce those nightly trips to the loo.

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