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Persistent Pelvic Pain Syndrome (PPPS) is a debilitating condition that has a huge negative impact on men’s physical, emotional and social health and wellbeing. It is more common than you think, with a study reporting 8% of Australian men identify as having pelvic pain. It is particularly distressing as many of the things men take for granted – sitting, walking, exercising, urinating, defaecating, sexual arousal and ejaculation - can cause crippling, agonising pain.
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Endometriosis-related pain levels are not always related to the extent of endometrial lesions. For many people, pain may not be relieved after removing the endometriosis through surgery, or hormonal treatment to suppress menstruation. Changes to the nervous system (brain, spinal cord and nerves) is one way to understand why some people don’t respond to current methods to treat their endometriosis-related pain.
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The inspiration for this piece is from one of our favourite books, “Come As You Are”, by Dr Emily Nagoski. Dr Nagoski has pulled together 10 years of research into women’s sexuality, and shares an essential exploration on how female arousal, desire, autonomy, pleasure and orgasm works, and provides tools for women to create and sustain a fulfilling sex life.
Endometriosis, a disease affecting 1 in 10 Australian women, can have devastating effects on many aspects of a woman’s life. Women with endometriosis typically deal with a huge variety of symptoms with the most significant usually being pain. This case study follows one of our patients, Sarah, on her road to recovery from endometriosis.

One in five women experience pain with sex, but most are too embarrassed to talk with their doctor, or confide in a friend. But want to know the good news? Painful sex is very treatable!